Sun to turn into planetary nebula when it dies: Astronomers

The good news is that the death and collapse of our sun is a long way off. Scientists predict that the sun will die in 10 billion years and now a new study has discovered what will happen after this takes place

The good news is that the death and collapse of our sun is a long way off. Scientists predict that the sun will die in 10 billion years and now a new study has discovered what will happen after this takes place

Now, a team of global researchers has managed to find out what will happen when the Sun dies.

About 10 billion years from now, our nearest star will run out of its stellar fuel, effectively marking the end of its life in space. It is middling in size and, at 5 billion years old, halfway through its lifetime. The model simulated the entire process of the star's ejection of the envelope. If it's even still there.

An worldwide group of astronomers has claimed to have figured out as to when the sun would die and what would eventually happen to it. We'll be about as kaput as you can get. They used the model to predict the brightness of the envelope - a ring of gas and dust ejected when a star dies - of stars with different ages and masses.

"We found that stars with a mass less than 1.1 times the mass of the sun produce fainter nebulae, and stars more massive than 3 solar masses [produce] brighter nebulae", study co-author Albert Zijlstra, a professor of astrophysics at the University of Manchester in the United Kingdom, said in a statement.

"The envelope can be as much as half the star's mass", Zijslra explains. The software takes into account the light measurements from other planetary nebulae, including chemical composition, carbon and oxygen environments, and the dynamics of the stellar winds coming off the dying star - and their consequent illumination by the waning core.

'Some are so bright that they can be seen from extremely large distances measuring tens of millions of light years, where the star itself would have been much too faint to see'.

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According to Science Daily, a team of researchers designed a new model predicting the lifespan of stars. "What we've shown is that the core will be hot enough in five to 10 thousand years after the outer layers have been ejected, and that is quick enough", Zijlstra tells Sample.

They're named planetary nebulae not because they actually have anything to do with planets, but because, when the first ones were discovered by William Herschel in the late 18th century, they were similar in appearance to planets through the telescopes of the time.

"Problem solved, after 25 years!" he added. As a result, some nebulae were not as visible from far away.

The new model contradicted previous data that corroborated this theory.

'The envelope can be as much as half the star's mass. "Problem solved, after 25 years!" The ejected envelope reveals the star's core, which in turn makes the ring of gas and dust shine bright enough for astronomers to spot the planetary nebula. However, the new model of this recent study shows the stars heating up three times faster than old models, which means low mass stars could still produce a visible planetary nebula. It happens for about 90 per cent of all stars, but was only believed to be for stars with double the Sun's mass.

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